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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
egypt in tunnels. coming literally through the country of egypt. the problem is they are coming from iran. in to egypt. in to the tums and in the gaza strip. they are shot from gaza to tel aviv. david lee mentioned today, but tell avive has seen missiles and jerusalem here, tel aviv ssiles are going this way. the issue here, this is hamas. hamas is a terrorist organization who are targeting population, civilian population centers within israel. that's why israel is retaliating with so many strikes back to the gaza strip. hezbollah and palestinians are more than willing to violate some geneva act, war crimes targeting the civilians. >> dana: they will. we want bob's take on this. first, listen to president obama who said america does stand with israel. >> there is no country on earth that would tolerate missiles raining down on its citizens from outside its borders. so we are fully supportive of israel's right to defend itself from missiles landing on people's homes. >> dana: that is president obama. of course, the leader of israel has words to say as well. listen to him. >> i hope th
morsi playing a pivotal role here. how is egypt calling the shots in terms of the way the palestinians are reacting? >> reporter: well, on the one hand, one needs to remember when it comes to mediating the deals between the two sides israel has always played a critical and central role. what has changed now is the dynamics between egypt and israel after the arab spring, and after the fact that hosni mubarak, who was a staunch ally of the east, is no longer in power. and now the egyptians became an entity because of the fact they are led by the muslim brotherhood, became an entity here in gaza. and that changed the dynamics and it has changed the way we have been seeing things the way they played out on the ground. the dynamics of what is transpiring that led to the cease-fire, we'll have to wait and see if it holds. that is what has changed, most certainly, egypt, given the fact it is a very young government, has at least for now proven itself. in one sense it has passed that critical test. >> arwa damon, thank you very much. welcome to you. >> thanks for having me. >> can you outline
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
of israel and hamas are in egypt separately for peace talks. hamas issuing its demand for a cease-fire. they want israel to end a long-running military blockade of gaza immediately. the carnage from the last 24 hours, arwa damon is in gaza city. >> reporter: the large slab of concrete and mangled metal finally gives way. buried beneath it, another lifeless body. it's the second child we've seen. there was also a baby. others in the neighborhood say the blast killed all ten people who lived here. israel says it was targeting a man who heads a rocket launch unit. people we spoke with said they never heard of him. this was a family home. >> people here are telling us that so far those who have been killed in this strike have been women and children. and they have not been able to find any survivors. just moments ago, from that back corner, they did pull out the body of a tiny child. an over here there's another frantic effort under way. tempers easily flare as frustration and anger mount. >> she's my uncle's wife, this young man shouts. rage coupled with sorrow etched across his face
what is said to be the home of an hamas leader. egypt is trying to prevent this war from getting out of hand. spearheading talks aimed at ending the violence. israel's prime minister says hamas can end all this. ben wedeman is watching the conflict play out. >> reporter: we've seen apparent urgent action by the israeli army in this area to get as much material, tanks, armored personnel carriers and troops in the area around gaza in obvious preparation for a potential ground invasion of the gaza strip. but a decision to actually go in has to come from the leadership, from prime minister benjamin netanyahu and from his security cabinet. that has not come yet. on sunday, it's expected that the secretary general of arab league is going to come to gaza with four arab foreign ministers. it may be difficult to launch a ground invasion while just a high-level group is there. we understand that intense contacts are under way between israel and the united states to potentially talk about a cease-fire. i spoke with a senior israeli spokesman who flatly denied reports that some sort of negotiate
with precision-guided missiles. in this case, striking what is said to be the home of an hamas leader. egypt is trying to prevent this war from getting out of hand. spearheading talks aimed at ending the violence. israel's prime minister says hamas can end all this. bd ben wedeman is watching the conflict play out. >> reporter: we've seen apparent urgent action by the israeli army in this area to get as much material, tanks, armoured personnel carriers and troops in the area around gaza in obvious preparation for a potential ground invasion of the gaza strip. but a decision to actually go in has to come from the leadership, from prime minister benjamin netanyahu and from his security cabinet. that has not come yet. on sunday, it's expected that the secretary general of arab league is going to come to gaza with four arab foreign ministers. it may be difficult to launch a ground invasion while just a high-level group is there. we understand that intense contacts are under way between israel and the united states to potentially talk about a cease-fire. i spoke with a senior israeli spokesman wh
. >> this is the ate latest in a series of moves he engaged in. in august he sidelined egypt's military council and took their powers for himself, the legislative and constitutional assembly powers they had and the only check remaining on his power after that time was the judiciary and now he swept aside that check. he has consolidated all power for thims and asked the people to trust him and guide egypt through this transitional period. >> protesters want him to step down. what do you see happening here? >> looks like neither side is prepared to back down. you're right. they're not prepared to trust him. morsi is not some sort of reveered national figure that played a role in the revolution. he seems a very partisan guy that really has islamist interests at heart so the liberals see no other choice but to go out in the street and protest until morsi backs down and looks like now both sides are angling for a compromise. >> what can the west do? >> i think it is no mistake this is taking place after the gaza conflict. the movie mentioned last year took place after a big terrorist attack in the s
do. bill: here we have new protests break out in egypt. have a look at this. [chanting] bill: apparently these are ultraconservative muslims rallying demanding egypt's new constitution be placed on islamic law or sharia law. moderate -ts and liberals pier it could endanger civil liberty. this is after mubark's regime was taken out last year. martha: we are learning that there could be some big changes at the top of the cabinet level positions in washington. including possibly attorney general eric holder that told a group of students yesterday that he doesn't know if he will stay in his job. >> i have to really ask myself the question about, you know, do i think that there are things that i still want to do? do i have gas left in the tank? it's been an interesting and tough four years. so i just really don't know. i don't know at this point. martha: interesting and tough is a good way to describe what the last term has been like for eric holder. joined now by chris wallace ""fox news sunday"" good morning. >> good morning, martha. martha: it's atmosphere interesting for a pre
, egypt will, turkey and perhaps others. so i think thuation is headed downhill. and unfortunately, increasingly rapid rate. >> thank you both very much for being with us. next, crout caught -- charles krauthammer on why americans want conservative. he is a star and future of the g.o.p., who else can join the ranks of marco rubio and re-energize the republicans for the next election. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. i'm thinking aboutpgrading... finally! jonathan was fine when you were in your 20s, but he's not right for you. good-bye jonathan and his creepy little girl hands. i meant... [ male announcer ] or choosing a windows 8 device with help from the experts at staples. another way staples and hp make it easier to upgrade. make your windows 8 experience even better with hp. and this week, get
herself has said, if iran gets nuclear weapon, saudi arabia will, egypt will, turkey and perhaps others. so i think thuation is headed downhill. and unfortunately, increasingly rapid rate. >> thank you both very much for being with us. next, crout caught -- charles krauthammer on why americans want conservative. he is a star and future of the g.o.p., who else can join the ranks of marco rubio >> welcome back to "hannity." tonight, the fallout from tuesday's election continues. if you listen to the narrative spun by the mainstream media in the wake of the barack obama victory, you would be led to believe that the republican party's finished. you would think a conservative candidate has no shot of getting elected. but that's not the case. and my next guest is here to explain why. in his latest column, charles krauthammer calls on republicans to stand by the conservative principles that define the g.o.p., and here's why. according to the exit polls, a majority of americans believe that the government does too much. 51-43%. in other words, there is very much anapp tight for conserveatism he
of letting the democracy happen what happened in egypt, libya, democratic elections. they're going to have to deal with their own almost civil war like we had to make sure that they get the government they want and not necessarily our outcome can't just be we can establish a government that's friendly to us. it has to be the people and sometimes it takes generations for these governments to really take hold and be by the people. host: thanks for the call. guest: that's a fair point. i wouldn't say that the problem in afghanistan is the united states is opposed to democracy per say. what i would say is that the united states and the rest of the international community and after gans themselves have a long way to go before they have something that looks like a credible and effective democracy takes root. and before we get there there is the prospect that the country could revert back to if not civil war but extensive conflict throughout the country, extreme violence and that is of concern to the united states. and the reason it's of concern is not simply a humanitarian one or to put who we w
your mother would be gone for years. she came to the u.s. in egypt even know it. >> guest: she's still like that in a way, you know, where she does things that we don't fit into the equation sometimes. and it's been a struggle to get her to be a little more motherly. i think at this point we've come to expect that's the way she is and we just take her as she is. i think it helps because we're not disappointed. i do hope we could be a better grandmother. i know my great-grandmother, my mother said she wasn't such a great mother. but to ask him if she was the most wonderful grandmother in the world. so i'm hoping that's the way my children feel for her as well. that's all i want for my kids have a good relationship. >> host: reyna grandecan assume other mother to read this book, or does she know within a? >> guest: she hasn't read the book is it's in english and my mother does not speak english. she knows some of us in it because i told her this is the story about my childhood and growing up in the u.s. and i write about you, my dad, but i don't think my mother really understand about ho
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)